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Spending time with Sascha Crasnow's Art and Resistance class

After sitting in on one of Sascha Crasnow’s zoom lectures, it’s clear that her students are active and engaged with Art and Resistance: Global Responses to Oppression.

Spending time with Sascha Crasnow's Art and Resistance class

Written by Marlon Rajan

Art And Resistance: Global Responses To Oppression

Dave: It sounds like you’ve got lively people in your class.

Sascha: Definitely! I think the class is one that attracts people who are interested in having these kinds of conversations. What is art’s potential, and what is art’s responsibility and what is our responsibility for art, with art, to do with art, but there comes up as we go along kind of common through-lines both in terms of how artists are approaching these things, and then some of these big picture conversations about art’s role and whether art can be effective in this way are things that are just ongoing conversations that we end up having.  

After sitting in on one of Sascha Crasnow’s recorded zoom lectures, it’s clear that her students are active and engaged with Art and Resistance: Global Responses to Oppression. As Dave Choberka explains some of the works chosen for Curriculum/Collection, he pauses for students to ask questions. One student questions the ethics of museums holding art pieces, while another wonders how to properly credit art pieces where the artist is unknown. 

Why is an unknown German piece credited as having been created by ‘anonymous’, but an unknown piece in non-European, non-American collections is more likely to be attributed to an entire people? The class continues this way, as students connect the art pieces to their personal lives and future career goals. 

Another student says she’s interested in working for a museum in some form later in life. She asks, “what is your opinion on the idea of returning objects back to where they came from originally?” In a conversation with Sascha Crasnow, Dave Choberka comments on the engagement of her students: “It sounds like you’ve got lively people in your class. That’s great.”

Other Recent C/C Stories

Afternoon (Flowers, Girl and Butterfly) is a 1972 woodcut piece by Tadashi Nakayama, and is included in the Florilegium section of Curriculum/Collection. Click through this interactive version to learn more about Tadashi's artistic process, and well as the symbolism of the flowers in his work.


This wood sculpture, Bombardement de Bukavu, by Songa Kaseke was selected for inclusion in the Curriculum/Collection exhibition for Sascha Crasnow’s “Art and Resistance” class.


A series of videos will take you on a deep dive into the works on view as part of the Florilegium course in Curriculum / Collection