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Hămaska in Tlŭ’wŭláḣŭ Costume with Speaker’s Staff – Qágyuhl

Edward S. Curtis; John Andrew & Son, Boston

Artwork Details

Hămaska in Tlŭ’wŭláḣŭ Costume with Speaker’s Staff – Qágyuhl
1914
Edward S. Curtis; John Andrew & Son, Boston
photogravure on paper
22 1/16 in x 17 5/8 in (56.1 cm x 44.8 cm);24 1/8 in x 20 1/8 in (61.28 cm x 51.12 cm)
Gift of Stephen M. Taylor
1997/1.161

Description

Subject Matter:

This image of man from the Qágyuhl tribe is from The North American Indian (1907 - 1930), a twenty-volume series created by Edward Curtis in order to document the lives of Native Americans in diverse regions of the Western United States. This limited edition volume was financially supported by J.P. Morgan, and promoted by Theodore Roosevelt. The resulting works have been criticized and celebrated for their portrayal of Native American life. Curtis often included anachronous props and clothing and presented rituals that had not been performed in years in order to support an idealized and romantic reading of a “vanishing race.”

Physical Description:

This is a portrait of an aging man in an outdoor landscape. He holds a large, carved wooden staff, which portrays an eagle at the top, and other faces and forms throughout the design. He wears an embroidered cloth draped over his body, a hat, and jewelry.

Usage Rights:

If you are interested in using an image for a publication, please visit https://umma.umich.edu/request-image/ for more information and to fill out the online Image Rights and Reproductions Request Form.